All Care Guides

Radiography

A radiograph (sometimes called an x-ray) is a type of photograph that reveals the body’s bones and internal organs. The procedure for obtaining a radiograph is called radiography.  Radiography is a very useful diagnostic tool for veterinarians because it can help obtain information about almost any organ in the body, including the heart, lungs, and abdominal organs, as well as the bones.

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Rattlesnake Vaccine

Each year, about 150,000 dogs and cats are bit by venomous snakes in the United States. Most bites occur during warmer months (between April and October in the northern hemisphere). Snakebites are painful, and the injected venom can result in tissue swelling, impaired blood clotting, shock, and sometimes death. Treatment may include antivenin (a serum that neutralizes the venom), pain medications, IV fluids, and antibiotics to control secondary infections. Even if the pet recovers, there may be long-term complications.

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Refilling Medications

Many illnesses in pets can require long-term administration of medication, including some very common medical conditions.

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Ringworm

Despite the name, ringworm is not caused by worms, but by a fungus. Most infections in pets are caused by one of three types of fungi, the most common being Microsporum canis. The fungi invade the superficial layers of the skin, hair, and/or nails. Because fungi thrive in moist environments, these organisms are especially persistent in humid climates and damp surroundings.

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Rodenticide Poisoning

Rodenticide poisoning occurs when dogs and cats accidentally eat mouse or rat poison. These products contain a wide range of ingredients that differ in potency and effect. In general, most rodent poisons cause one of three effects in animals:   

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